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14 ways to eat lessLet’s face it. No one likes to hear “YOU CAN’T HAVE THAT”.

Having to stick to a “DIET” by restricting and depriving doesn’t work very well. Obviously. If it did, the weight loss industry would not be generating $20 BILLION dollars a year from return customers.

Just as soon as someone says you can’t have that, you start craving that very thing.

At 50 years old, I am done with restricting myself on anything. However, I still desire a healthy body and that means I can’t just shove anything I want into this mouth. If I eat too much, I am going to get fat.  And, um, just because I am 50 does not mean that I have earned the right or have the desire to be fat, frumpy or out of shape either.

Let’s not beat around the bush here. If you are uncomfortable at your present weight and want to drop a few, you’ll want to pick up a few new habits. You are going to have to change some things.

Going on a “DIET” is not your answer. Restricting your food miserably is not the answer. The next best secret reveal on the internet is not the answer. The glorified magic potion, formula, powder or pill is not your magic answer. It is a set up for your next diet.

So what is the answer?

The answer is mindfully eating less without feeling deprived, restricted or aggravated. It means you slow down, take notice and become mindful of what you are eating and taking into that precious body of yours.

Chances are good that if you are feeling uncomfortable in your body right now, if your clothes feel tight, if you feel bloated, stuffed and icky, that you are eating too much food.

YUP.  SORRY FOR THE REVELATION. YOU ARE EATING TOO MUCH.

Okay, I’m not really sorry. I am happy to share this information that can help you change for the better.

It always comes down to eating too much. You know those out of control portions and out of your mind pickings and the food that goes into your mouth without you noticing.

Your mouth and your mind have got to be in sync.

People often complain, “I don’t understand why I can’t lose weight!  I do everything right“.  As I start asking more questions, the big reveal comes along. They finally get to the fact that they are “picking here, there and everywhere, everyday, but just a little”….  Ummm.  Hmmm.  (Oh and that glass of wine or maybe two, not every night, but maybe almost- sound familiar?)

Be honest.

You can try and blame your age, your kids, your relationship, the other person, your metabolism, your menopause, a cold, your lack of exercise…. but come on!

Really?

You’re eating too much food most of the time. Ultimately your body will give you some kind of signal that you are eating too much.

Even if you are eating “really healthy” or totally NAKED (like I do), you could still be eating too much. Too much food is almost always the reason you’re are not at your perfect weight. (Let me be clear that I am not a doctor or a physic and there may be other reasons but really get really honest about what you are doing or not doing first. Before you search out the Holy Grail, look at your plate).

Whatever body weight you are right now is being fueled and sustained by the food you eat. If you are not comfortable or where you want to be, you may try some of these ideas that support you with more mindful eating.

Notice I did not say diet, deprive, deplete, suffer, endure, or starve! Screw that. I am way over all that lack stuff.  I bet you’re over it too! It’s not about less… it’s actually about more. How can you show up MORE with your food and embrace this nourishing experience in MORE mindful ways? SHOW UP MORE MINDFULLY. (I love this concept – easier said but very very possible).

Obviously if what you are doing is keeping you where you are, it’s time for a change or two! Doing things differently makes sense. I am offering actions steps that will help you to embrace new practices.

Here are 14 ways for you to eat less without feeling deprived, restricted or aggravated. Implementing any or all of these suggestions will help reduce your intake of unnecessary calories without you really feeling it. Over a very short period of time, the results will be noticeable in how you look and feel.

These skills that are learned with practice and patience and will eventually become your go to habit. These habits are a way of living in mindfulness and presence with your food. You decide and you get to choose.

1. SHAVE IT

Using a ginger mincer, shave 1/4 of a frozen banana on top of your yogurt, oats, smoothie, pancakes. This little bit goes a long way in adding fluff and satisfaction because the banana shreds up a nice mound of fluffy banana. Watch how I do it here.

2. MIX UP

If you’re like me a heaping tbsp of nut butter is really, really heaping, plus a little bit more. By using only 1/2 tsp nut butter and mixing it with 2 tbsp plain Fage greek yogurt, a pinch of cinnamon, I get much more. You’ll have a lot to spread on your apple or on your toast.

3. ASK AHEAD

Restaurant portions are totally deceiving and you’d most likely be more than satisfied with only 1/2 the amount on that plate. But don’t get caught with your hand in the jar. Ask first. As soon as your order is placed in front of you, ask for the to go container and put half of your food out of site for tomorrow before you even begin eating.

4. CREATE IT

When ordering salads, be the creator of your own. Scan the menu for the veggies you want and ask to add them in. Also request (the waiter by this point knows you’re one of those) that all dried fruit and nuts and dressings be delivered on the side so you can control and create how much of it you want to add on.

5. PLATE IT

Use a large cake plate in place of a huge dinner plate to serve your meal on, giving you the satisfying illusion of a very filled plate. And it will be more than enough.

6. BE AWARE

Be aware of how much you serve by using a “1/2 cup measuring scoop” as your serving spoon to serve your grains or pasta.

7. DO SINGLES

Enjoy and appreciate single serving squares of dark chocolate and savor one a day. Don’t be caught whispering, “I can’t believe I ate the whole thing” when you buy a big bar that seems to find its way to your mouth.

8. LEAVE BEHIND

Practice the art of leaving at least on bite on your plate. One bite left at every meal can add up to a full plate by the end of the week.

10. ADD EXTRA

Add one more to the mix and make portion sizes smaller than the recipe calls for – if the recipe makes 4 cupcakes, stretch it to make 5.

11. STOP IT

Stop trying so hard. Let go. This one may seem weird to you, but seriously, it is the most effective of all. Stop it. Stop trying so hard. Just implement a skill or two or three, with consistency and with patience. Your results and changes in your body will show up with grace and ease.

12. YUM & DONE

When indulging in a treat, yum up the first, most rewarding, most delicious bite. Close your eyes and let this bite be the one that gives you the experience you crave. Take your time and experience all the feelings that go with the first bite. Moan if you have to. You won’t need much more after that.

13. MAKE CHOICES

Stop thinking lack and start thinking choice. You choose what you eat, how you eat it and when you eat it based on how you want to feel. Eating from this power-filled state feels so much better, which makes you less anxious, lowering cortisol levels and improving digestion.

14. KNOW THE REASON

When you feel like eating for a reason other than physical hunger, notice that reason, feel it, breath, ask yourself what you really want and then make your move to substitute something else that will nurture and satisfy you even more than food.

I’d love to hear which ideas help you to feel better connected to your food and your body.

Rosie Battista’s fun and content filled website http://rosiebattista.com offers blogs, vlogs, and products that help you BE GORGEOUS and FEEL AMAZING.

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14 Ways To Eat Less Without Feeling Deprived or Restricted was last modified: by

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